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WINTER SPORTS

In 2010 over 6 million individuals participated in the winter sports of snowmobiling, snowboarding and ice skating. These sports accounted for over 91,000 emergency room-treated injuries, according to the National Safety Council. According to the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA), during the past 10 years, about 41.5 people have died skiing/snowboarding per year on average. During the 2011/12 season, 54 fatalities occurred out of the 51.0 million skier/snowboarder days reported for the season. Thirty-nine of the fatalities were skiers and 12 of the fatalities were snowboarders (See NSAA Safety Facts). The charts below provide further information on sports and recreational injuries

BICYCLE CRASHES

In 2009 an estimated 51,000 bicyclists were injured in motor vehicle traffic crashes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Some 17 percent, or an estimated 8,000, of the bicyclists who were injured were age 14 and younger. Bicyclists accounted for 2 percent of all traffic fatalities and also made up 2 percent of all the people injured in traffic crashes during 2009, according to NHTSA.

 

PEDALCYCLISTS KILLED AND FATALITY RATES, 2010 (1)
Age group Killed Population (000) Fatality rate per
million population
Under 5 1 20,201 0.05
5 to 9 18 20,382 0.88
10 to 15 48 24,941 1.92
16 to 20 42 22,269 1.89
21 to 24 39 17,111 2.28
25 to 34 62 41,247 1.50
35 to 44 81 40,981 1.98
45 to 54 146 45,013 3.24
55 to 64 110 36,766 2.99
65 to 74 44 21,841 2.01
75 to 84 21 13,063 1.61
Over 85 2 5,533 0.36
Total (2) 618 309,350 2.00

(1) Includes riders of bicycles and other non-motorized vehicles powered by pedals, such as tricycles and unicycles.
(2) Includes pedalcyclists of unknown age.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; Bureau of the Census.

View Archived Tables

 

 

PEDALCYCLISTS INJURED AND INJURY RATES, 2010 (1)
Age group Injured Population (000) Injury rate per
million population
Under 5 (2) 20,201 8
5 to 9 2,000 20,382 121
10 to 15 8,000 24,941 321
16 to 20 7,000 22,269 292
21 to 24 6,000 17,111 377
25 to 34 10,000 41,247 232
35 to 44 7,000 40,981 163
45 to 54 7,000 45,013 150
55 to 64 3,000 36,766 89
65 to 74 1,000 21,841 45
75 to 84 1,000 13,063 60
Over 85 (2) 5,533 22
Total 52,000 309,350 167

(1) Includes riders of bicycles and other non-motorized vehicles powered by pedals, such as tricycles and unicycles.
(2) Less than 500 injured.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; Bureau of the Census.

View Archived Tables

 

 

MOTORCYCLIST FATALITIES AND FATALITY RATES, 2001-2010
Year Fatalities Registered motorcycles Fatality rate per 100,000 registered vehicles Vehicle miles traveled (millions) Fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled
2001 3,197 4,903,056 65.20 9,633 33.19
2002 3,270 5,004,156 65.35 9,552 34.23
2003 3,714 5,370,035 69.16 9,576 38.78
2004 4,028 5,767,934 69.83 10,122 39.79
2005 4,576 6,227,146 73.48 10,454 43.77
2006 4,837 6,678,958 72.42 12,049 40.14
2007 5,174 7,138,476 72.48 21,369 24.18
2008 5,312 7,752,926 68.52 20,811 25.52
2009 4,469 7,929,724 56.36 20,822 21.46
2010 4,502 8,212,267 54.82 18,462 24.39

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; Federal Highway Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

 

MOTORCYCLIST INJURIES AND INJURY RATES, 2001-2010
Year Injuries Registered motorcycles Injury rate per 100,000 registered motorcycles Vehicle miles traveled (millions) Injury rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled
2001 60,000 4,903,056 1,229 9,633 625
2002 65,000 5,004,156 1,293 9,552 677
2003 67,000 5,370,035 1,250 9,576 701
2004 76,000 5,767,934 1,324 10,122 755
2005 87,000 6,227,146 1,402 10,454 835
2006 88,000 6,678,958 1,312 12,049 727
2007 103,000 7,138,476 1,443 21,396 481
2008 96,000 7,752,926 1,238 20,811 461
2009 90,000 7,929,724 1,130 20,822 430
2010 82,000 8,212,267 998 18,462 444

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; Federal Highway Administration.

View Archived Tables

 

SPORT INJURIES

Biking is the most dangerous sport, followed by basketball and football, based on estimates of injuries treated in hospital emergency departments compiled by the National Safety Council.

The National Council reports that there were 225,493 swimming injuries treated in emergency rooms in 2010. About 42 percent of the injuries involved children between the ages of 5 and 14. A July 2012 analysis by the Consumer Product Safety Commission found that 90 children under 15 years of age have drowned since Memorial Day and an additional 106 children of that age required emergency response in near-drowning incidents.

There has been growing concern about the risks of sports-related concussions as lawsuits filed by injured professional football players have generated national headlines. The problem also affects thousands of young people who engage in a variety of sports. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that an estimated 173,285 sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI), including concussions, among children and adolescents are treated in U.S. emergency rooms annually. Biking, football, playground activities, basketball and soccer are among the leading activities associated with TBI injuries treated in emergency rooms. For further information see http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/sports/facts.html

 

SPORTS PARTICIPATION AND INJURIES, UNITED STATES, 2010
Percent of injuries by age
Sport or activity Participants Injuries (1)
0-4 5-14 15-24 25-64 65 and over
Archery 6,500,000 6,162 0.6% 10.7% 27.5% 44.5% 16.7%
Baseball 12,500,000 162,925 2.5 49.8 27.3 19.6 0.8
Softball 10,800,000 119,389 0.3 27.6 31.0 40.3 0.9
Basketball 26,900,000 528,584 0.4 31.3 48.9 19.3 0.2
Bicycle riding (2) 39,800,000 530,551 5.4 38.8 17.7 34.0 4.1
Billiards, pool 24,000,000 4,516 4.1 18.5 22.4 49.5 5.5
Bowling 39,000,000 24,263 9.1 13.1 17.0 49.7 11.1
Boxing NA 22,055 (3) 9.8 50.7 39.1 0.4
Cheerleading 2,900,000 (4) 36,288 0.1 51.9 46.3 1.7 (3)
Exercise NA 291,173 (5) 2.5 11.7 20.2 55.4 10.2
Fishing 33,800,000 69,963 3.3 16.7 13.0 55.9 11.2
Football 9,300,000 (6) 489,676 0.3 49.2 40.7 9.7 0.1
Golf 21,900,000 35,199 (7) 4.6 18.4 7.8 40.1 29.1
Gymnastics 4,800,000 28,743 (8) 3.4 70.2 21.5 4.9 0.1
Hockey, street and field NA 8,210 (9) 0.6 37.1 55.5 6.8 (3)
Horseback riding NA 68,871 1.6 17.6 20.9 55.4 4.5
Horseshoe pitching NA 2,504 3.5 15.5 11.7 53.6 15.7
Ice hockey 3,300,000 19,613 0.1 31.3 52.9 15.6 0.1
Ice skating NA 23,046 1.7 48.9 21.4 26.0 1.9
Martial arts NA 33,104 1.0 21.7 30.2 46.5 0.7
Mountain biking 7,200,000 11,195 0.1 7.7 27.0 64.4 0.8
Mountain climbing NA 3,478 2.0 12.9 36.6 41.8 6.6
Racquetball, squash and paddleball NA 5,715 0.1 3.7 29.7 61.9 4.6
Roller skating NA 68,657 (10) 0.6 54.9 13.1 30.9 0.5
Rugby NA 15,105 (3) 4.9 77.5 17.6 (3)
Scuba diving NA 1,331 (11) 1.2 6.2 34.0 52.3 6.3
Skateboarding 7,700,000 130,627 1.3 45.1 43.0 10.4 0.1
Snowboarding 6,100,000 57,555 (3) 26.8 49.2 23.7 0.2
Snowmobiling NA 11,010 (3) 7.2 22.6 66.3 3.9
Soccer 13,500,000 226,142 0.7 42.4 39.4 17.4 0.1
Swimming 51,900,000 225,493 (12) 9.8 41.9 17.8 27.6 2.8
Tennis 12,300,000 22,768 0.8 15.4 21.0 41.0 21.7
Track and field NA 27,830 (3) 35.2 50.6 13.2 1.0
Volleyball 10,600,000 58,072 0.3 30.7 41.0 27.1 0.9
Water skiing 5,200,000 8,881 0.8 10.2 34.5 54.5 (3)
Weight lifting 31,500,000 94,692 3.6 10.2 33.7 49.8 2.7
Wrestling 2,900,000 42,486 (3) 36.4 59.1 4.5 (3)

(1) Treated in hospital emergency departments.
(2) Excludes mountain biking.
(3) Less than 0.1 percent.
(4) Data for 2008.
(5) Includes exercise equipment (61,196 injuries) and exercise activity (229,977 injuries).
(6) Includes participation in tackle football only.
(7) Excludes golf carts (13,838 injuries).
(8) Excludes trampolines (92,159 injuries).
(9) Excludes 6,069 injuries in skating, unspecified.
(10) Includes roller skating (51,956 injuries) and in-line skating (16,701 injuries).
(11) Data for 2009.
(12) Includes injuries associated with swimming, swimming pools (2008 data), pool slides (2008 data), diving or diving boards and swimming pool equipment.

NA=Data not available.

Source: National Safety Council.

View Archived Tables

 

 

TOP TEN SPORTS BY PARTICIPATION, 2001-2011 (1)
(millions)
Rank Sport 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011
1 Exercise walking 71.2 79.5 86.0 89.8 93.4 97.1
2 Exercising with equipment 43.0 48.6 54.2 52.9 57.2 55.5
3 Swimming 54.8 47.0 58.0 52.3 50.2 46.0
4 Camping (vacation/overnight) 45.5 51.4 46.0 47.5 50.9 42.8
5 Aerobic exercising 24.3 28.0 33.7 34.8 33.2 42.0
6 Bicycle riding 39.0 36.3 43.1 37.4 38.1 39.1
7 Hiking 26.1 25.0 29.8 28.6 34.0 39.1
8 Running/jogging 24.5 22.9 29.2 30.4 32.2 38.7
9 Bowling 40.3 39.4 45.4 43.5 45.0 34.9
10 Workout at club 26.5 29.5 34.7 36.8 38.3 34.5

(1) Includes people age 7 years old or older who participated more than once. Based on a survey conducted every two years.

Source: National Sporting Goods Association.

View Archived Tables

 

RECREATIONAL BOATING

Federal law requires owners of recreational boats to register them. In 2011 there were 12.2 million registered boats, down from 12.9 million in 2007. An accident occurring on a recreational boat must be reported to the Coast Guard if a person dies or is injured and requires medical treatment beyond first aid, if damage to the boat or other property exceeds $2,000, if the boat is lost or if a person disappears from the boat. Out of the 4,588 accidents reported in 2011, 685 occurred in Florida, accounting for 15 percent of all incidents. Other states with a high number of boating accidents were California (399), Texas (197), Maryland (184) and New York (173).

Boating fatalities rose 12.8 percent from 672 in 2010 to 758 in 2011. The rate per 100,000 registered boats was 6.2, up from 5.4 in 2010. The number of accidents fell 0.3 percent from 4,604 in 2010 to 4,588 in 2011. Injuries also fell, from 3,153 in 2010 to 3,081 in 2011, or 2.3 percent. Property damage totaled $52 million in 2011, up 44 percent from 2010 but below the record $54 million in 2008.

Research has shown that alcohol, combined with typical boating conditions such as motion, vibration, engine noise, sun, wind and spray can impair a person's abilities much faster than alcohol consumption on land. Boat operators with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) above 0.10 percent are estimated to be more than 10 times more likely to be killed in a boating accident than boat operators with zero BAC. Alcohol was the largest human factor in boating deaths in 2011 (16 percent of boating fatalities), causing 149 deaths in 361 accidents and resulting in 306 injuries. Other factors were operator inattention, accounting for 58 deaths, and operator inexperience, resulting in 43 deaths.

 

RECREATIONAL BOATING ACCIDENTS, 2007-2011 (1)
Accidents Fatalities
Year Total Involving
alcohol use (2)
Total Involving
alcohol use (2)
Injuries Property damage
($ millions)
2007 5,191 421 685 157 3,673 $53
2008 4,789 387 709 153 3,331 54
2009 4,730 397 736 165 3,358 36
2010 4,604 395 672 154 3,153 36
2011 4,588 361 758 149 3,081 52

(1) Includes accidents involving $2,000 or more in property damage.
(2) The use of alcohol by a boat's occupants was a direct or indirect cause of the accident.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Coast Guard.

View Archived Tables
  • Seven out of 10 or 70 percent of fatal boating accident victims drowned in 2011 and, of those, 84 percent were not wearing life jackets.
  • The most common types of boats involved in reported accidents in 2011 were open motorboats (47 percent), personal watercraft (19 percent) and cabin motorboats (14 percent).

 

 

TOP TEN STATES BY RECREATIONAL BOATING ACCIDENTS, 2011
Rank State Accidents Deaths People injured Property damage ($000)
1 Florida 685 61 422 $24,816
2 California 399 52 322 1,849
3 Texas 197 37 105 1,292
4 Maryland 184 19 165 1,410
5 New York 173 28 104 3,321
6 Arizona 158 11 133 477
7 North Carolina 144 28 79 1,213
8 Ohio 135 15 96 1,025
9 Michigan 129 26 101 978
10 Missouri 128 20 85 609

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Coast Guard.

Article Source: http://www.iii.org

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