WORKERS COMPENSATION INSURANCE

Workers compensation insurance provides for the cost of medical care and rehabilitation for injured workers and lost wages and death benefits for the dependents of persons killed in work-related accidents. Workers compensation systems vary from state to state. Workers compensation combined ratios are expressed in two ways. Calendar year results reflect claim payments and changes in reserves for accidents that happened in that year or earlier. Accident year results only include losses from a particular year.

 

WORKERS COMPENSATION INSURANCE, 2002-2011
($000)
      Combined ratio (1)
Year Net premiums
written (2)
Annual percent
change
Calendar
year (3)
Annual point change (4) Accident
year (5)
Annual point change
2002 $30,735,382 13.9% 110.5 -10.2 pts. 106 -19 pts.
2003 32,941,961 7.2 109.7 -0.8 97 -9
2004 36,688,888 11.4 106.0 -3.6 88 -9
2005 39,788,398 8.4 101.9 -4.2 87 -1
2006 41,735,186 4.9 96.5 -5.4 86 -1
2007 40,582,828 -2.8 100.6 4.1 98 12
2008 36,523,030 -10.0 101.0 0.4 104 6
2009 32,009,874 -12.4 108.0 7.0 109 5
2010 31,483,471 -1.6 115.9 7.9 116 7
2011 35,666,609 13.3 117.2 1.3 114 (6) -2

(1) After dividends to policyholders. A drop in the combined ratio represents an improvement; an increase represents a deterioration.
(2) After reinsurance transactions, excluding state funds.
(3) Calendar year data are from SNL Financial.
(4) Calculated from unrounded data.
(5) Accident year data are from the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI).
(6) Estimated by NCCI.

Source: SNL Financial LC; National Council on Compensation Insurance.

View Archived Tables

 

 

TOP TEN OCCUPATIONS WITH THE LARGEST NUMBER OF INJURIES AND ILLNESSES, 2011 (1)
Rank Occupation Number Percent of total
1 Laborers (nonconstruction) 53,660 5.9%
2 Truckdrivers, heavy 42,210 4.6
3 Nursing assistants 40,300 4.4
4 Production workers 26,340 2.9
5 Truckdrivers, light 25,380 2.8
6 Janitors and cleaners 24,450 2.7
7 Retail salespersons 23,430 2.6
8 Registered nurses 22,150 2.4
9 Stock clerks and order fillers 21,260 2.3
10 Maintenance, general 21,230 2.3
  Total, top ten
300,410 33.1%
  Total, all occupations 908,310 100.0%

(1) Nonfatal injuries and illnesses involving days off from work for private industries; excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

View Archived Tables

 

CAUSES OF WORKPLACE DEATHS

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the highest rate of workplace fatalities in 2011 was among fishing workers, with 121 deaths per 100,000 full-time employees, followed by logging workers, aircraft pilots and flight engineers, and refuse and recyclable material collector. The all-industry average was 3.5 deaths per 100,000 workers.

 

WORKPLACE DEATHS BY CAUSE, 2011 (1)
  2011 Fatalities
Cause Number Percent of total
All transportation (includes vehicle crashes) 1,898 41%
     Vehicle crashes (2) 1,075 23
Assaults and violence (includes homicides) 780 17
     Homicides 458 10
Contact with objects and equipment 708 15
Falls 666 14
Exposure to harmful substances or environments 401 9
Fires and explosions 143 3
Total workplace fatalities 4,609 100%

(1) From intentional and unintentional sources.
(2) Roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicles.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

View Archived Tables

Article Source://www.iii.org
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